Crea Max200 pure creatine monohydrate

  • supports & protects muscles
  • helps preserve energy & reduce fatigue
  • pure creatine monohydrate, no additives
  • easy to swallow 120 vegan capsules
  • suitable for men & women

£14.99

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number 1 supplement for strength – train harder, for longer

WHAT IS CREATINE
A natural substance made by our bodies from dietary protein, used by the muscles and the brain.

WHY SUPPLEMENT CREATINE
In order to replace the used up creatine we need to produce more from diet every day. However, our body’s ability to make it drops with age or when we train hard and simply need more than we can make. For example in order to produce 3g of creatine you would need to eat 1.5kg of red meat. Supplementing creatine is therefore a quick and inexpensive way of increasing your body’s stores.

BENEFITS
• provides quicks bursts of energy
• repairs and builds muscle volume and strength
• improves stamina and reduces fatigue
• supports cognition & brain function

WHO SHOULD TAKE CREATINE
• amateur & pro athletes – runners, cyclists etc
• gym goers, bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts
• anyone aiming to improve their muscle strength
• anyone aiming to protect and boost their brain power
• older men and women wishing to preserve muscle mass
• vegetarians, anyone who doesn’t consume large amounts of meat protein

SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE
Taking creatine is shown by research to lead to faster muscle growth, better performance, prevention from injury and faster post workout recovery. There is evidence that creatine supplements helps cognitive function and memory and to have anti-aging benefits such as reducing age-related bone and muscle loss.

SAFETY & DOSAGE
Creatine-monohydrate is considered safe and well-tolerated and health authorities state that significant health benefits may be provided by a regular long-term supplementation of 3g of creatine daily.

MR RUN’S CREA MAX200
• premium quality pure creatine – no additives, fillers, or bulking agent
• contains the most absorbable and digestible form of creatine on the market
• rapid-acting – gets to work in your muscles fast
science-backed 3g serving once per day (one month’s supply)

Creatine Monohydrate (Vegan Micronised 200 Mesh) 750mg per capsule

Other ingredients: Vegetarian capsule shell

120 capsules per pack.

SUGGESTED USE

Take 4 capsules daily with a glass of water

CREATINE LOADING – SUGGESTED USE

If taking creatine for the first time you may want to take a higher dose for the first several days in order to reach a higher body load of creatine.
Recommended loading protocol: take 5 capsules 5 times per day for 5 days. At the end of this 5 day period resume the regular maintenance dose of 4 capsules per day.

Can creatine cause harm? Are there side effects?

No, there are no known harmful side-effects to taking creatine, but if you suffer any chronic condition or taken long-term medication talk to your doctor before taking any supplements.

Due to a lack of research around the topic you should also avoid taking creatine when pregnant or breastfeeding.

How many creatine capsules in a pack?

Each pouch contains 120 capsules with 750mg creatine monohydrate powder in each capsule.

How do I take creatine?

It’s in capsule form and you can swallow it with water or any other drink.

How much creatine should I take?

Take 4 capsules daily with a glass of water

‘CREATINE LOADING’ – SUGGESTED USE
When taking creatine for the first time you may want to do a ‘creatine loading’, meaning taking a higher dose in order to saturate muscles with creatine.
Recommended loading protocol: take 5 capsules 5 times per day for 5 days.
At the end of this 5 day period resume the regular maintenance dose of 4 capsules per day.

What is creatine loading and should I do it?

When taking creatine for the first time it is often recommended take a higher dose than usual for the first several days in order to reach a higher body saturation of creatine.
Recommended loading protocol: take 5 capsules 5 times per day for 5 days. At the end of this 5 day period resume the regular maintenance dose of 4 capsules per day.

Please note that creatine loading is NOT obligatory. It is just a faster way, a shortcut for achieving a high level of creatine in the body. If you do not wish to undertake a loading phase you can just take the regular dose straight from the start, but keep in mind that it might take a bit longer to achieve desired effects.

Do I need to ‘cycle’ creatine? Can it be taken continuously?

Creatine is safe and effective to take all year, no cycling is required. However as with all other nutritional supplements, you may sometimes see good effects with pausing for a few weeks and then resuming.

Is creatine suitable for women? Can women benefit from creatine

Yes, creatine is suitable for all adults, both men and women.
There is plenty of evidence on creatine being beneficial for women.

What are the benefits of creatine for older people?

Yes, there is lots of scientific research showing several potential benefits of creatine supplements in seniors, including:

  • protects ageing muscle and reduces age related muscle loss, particularly when combined with resistance exercise
  • supports brain function & memory
  • lowers inflammation and oxidative stress
  • improves blood sugar control
  • may improve bone density and reduce the risk of bone fractures

What's the scientific evidence on creatine for these claims?

This is a busy area of research and hundreds of scientific studies have been so far on the effects of creatine, with more being published every month.

We list below small section of that research.Aguiar, A. F. et al. (2013) ‘Long-term creatine supplementation improves muscular performance during resistance training in older women’, European journal of applied physiology. Eur J Appl Physiol, 113(4), pp. 987–996. doi: 10.1007/S00421-012-2514-6.

Antonio, J. and Ciccone, V. (2013) ‘The effects of pre versus post workout supplementation of creatine monohydrate on body composition and strength’, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 10. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-10-36.

Avgerinos, K. I. et al. (2018) ‘Effects of creatine supplementation on cognitive function of healthy individuals: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials’, Experimental gerontology. Exp Gerontol, 108, pp. 166–173. doi: 10.1016/J.EXGER.2018.04.013.

Bassit, R. A., Curi, R. and Costa Rosa, L. F. B. P. (2008) ‘Creatine supplementation reduces plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and PGE2 after a half-ironman competition’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 35(2), pp. 425–431. doi: 10.1007/S00726-007-0582-4.

Becque, M. D., Lochmann, J. D. and Melrose, D. R. (2000) ‘Effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscular strength and body composition’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 32(3), pp. 654–658. doi: 10.1097/00005768-200003000-00016.

Bemben, M. G. et al. (2001) ‘Creatine supplementation during resistance training in college football athletes’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 33(10), pp. 1667–1673. doi: 10.1097/00005768-200110000-00009.

Bosco, C. et al. (1997) ‘Effect of oral creatine supplementation on jumping and running performance’, International journal of sports medicine. Int J Sports Med, 18(5), pp. 369–372. doi: 10.1055/S-2007-972648.

Bredahl, E. C. et al. (2021) ‘The Role of Creatine in the Development and Activation of Immune Responses’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 13(3), pp. 1–17. doi: 10.3390/NU13030751.

Burke, D. G. et al. (2003) ‘Effect of creatine and weight training on muscle creatine and performance in vegetarians’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 35(11), pp. 1946–1955. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000093614.17517.79.

Burke, D. G. et al. (2008) ‘Effect of creatine supplementation and resistance-exercise training on muscle insulin-like growth factor in young adults’, International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 18(4), pp. 389–398. doi: 10.1123/IJSNEM.18.4.389.

Butts, J., Jacobs, B. and Silvis, M. (2018) ‘Creatine Use in Sports’, Sports Health. SAGE Publications, 10(1), p. 31. doi: 10.1177/1941738117737248.

Candow, D. G. et al. (2021) ‘Current Evidence and Possible Future Applications of Creatine Supplementation for Older Adults’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 13(3), pp. 1–18. doi: 10.3390/NU13030745.

Candow, D. G. et al. (2022) ‘Creatine supplementation for older adults: Focus on sarcopenia, osteoporosis, frailty and Cachexia’, Bone. Bone, 162. doi: 10.1016/J.BONE.2022.116467.

Chilibeck, P. et al. (2017) ‘Effect of creatine supplementation during resistance training on lean tissue mass and muscular strength in older adults: a meta-analysis’, Open access journal of sports medicine. Open Access J Sports Med, 8, pp. 213–226. doi: 10.2147/OAJSM.S123529.

Clarke, H., Hickner, R. C. and Ormsbee, M. J. (2021) ‘The Potential Role of Creatine in Vascular Health’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 13(3), pp. 1–28. doi: 10.3390/NU13030857.

Cordingley, D. M., Cornish, S. M. and Candow, D. G. (2022) ‘Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Catabolic Effects of Creatine Supplementation: A Brief Review’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 14(3). doi: 10.3390/NU14030544.

Dalbo, V. J. et al. (2008) ‘Putting to rest the myth of creatine supplementation leading to muscle cramps and dehydration’, British journal of sports medicine. Br J Sports Med, 42(7), pp. 567–573. doi: 10.1136/BJSM.2007.042473.

Dalbo, V. J. et al. (2009) ‘The effects of age on skeletal muscle and the phosphocreatine energy system: can creatine supplementation help older adults’, Dynamic medicine : DM. Dyn Med, 8(1). doi: 10.1186/1476-5918-8-6.

Devries, M. C. and Phillips, S. M. (2014) ‘Creatine supplementation during resistance training in older adults-a meta-analysis’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 46(6), pp. 1194–1203. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000220.

Farshidfar, F., Pinder, M. A. and Myrie, S. B. (2017) ‘Creatine Supplementation and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism for Building Muscle Mass- Review of the Potential Mechanisms of Action’, Current protein & peptide science. Curr Protein Pept Sci, 18(12). doi: 10.2174/1389203718666170606105108.

Fernández-Landa, J. et al. (2019) ‘Effect of the Combination of Creatine Monohydrate Plus HMB Supplementation on Sports Performance, Body Composition, Markers of Muscle Damage and Hormone Status: A Systematic Review’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 11(10). doi: 10.3390/NU11102528.

Fernández-Landa, J., Fernández-Lázaro, D., Calleja-González, J., Caballero-García, A., Martínez, A. C., et al. (2020) ‘Effect of Ten Weeks of Creatine Monohydrate Plus HMB Supplementation on Athletic Performance Tests in Elite Male Endurance Athletes’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 12(1). doi: 10.3390/NU12010193.

Fernández-Landa, J., Fernández-Lázaro, D., Calleja-González, J., Caballero-García, A., Córdova, A., et al. (2020) ‘Long-Term Effect of Combination of Creatine Monohydrate Plus β-Hydroxy β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Anabolic/Catabolic Hormones in Elite Male Endurance Athletes’, Biomolecules. Biomolecules, 10(1). doi: 10.3390/BIOM10010140.

Forbes, S. C. et al. (2019) ‘Changes in Fat Mass Following Creatine Supplementation and Resistance Training in Adults ≥50 Years of Age: A Meta-Analysis’, Journal of functional morphology and kinesiology. J Funct Morphol Kinesiol, 4(3). doi: 10.3390/JFMK4030062.

Forbes, S. C. et al. (2021) ‘Meta-analysis examining the importance of creatine ingestion strategies on lean tissue mass and strength in older adults’, Nutrients. MDPI, 13(6). doi: 10.3390/NU13061912/S1.

Forbes, S. C., Ostojic, S. M., et al. (2022) ‘A High Dose of Creatine Combined with Resistance Training Appears to Be Required to Augment Indices of Bone Health in Older Adults’, Annals of nutrition & metabolism. Ann Nutr Metab, 78(3). doi: 10.1159/000520967.

Forbes, S. C., Cordingley, D. M., et al. (2022) ‘Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Brain Function and Health’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 14(5). doi: 10.3390/NU14050921.

Forbes, S. C., Candow, D. G., et al. (2022) ‘Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Properties of Muscle, Bone, and Brain Function in Older Adults: A Narrative Review’, Journal of dietary supplements. J Diet Suppl, 19(3), pp. 318–335. doi: 10.1080/19390211.2021.1877232.

Gotshalk, L. A. et al. (2002) ‘Creatine supplementation improves muscular performance in older men’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 34(3), pp. 537–543. doi: 10.1097/00005768-200203000-00023.

Gotshalk, L. A. et al. (2008) ‘Creatine supplementation improves muscular performance in older women’, European journal of applied physiology. Eur J Appl Physiol, 102(2), pp. 223–231. doi: 10.1007/S00421-007-0580-Y.

Greenwood, M. et al. (2003) ‘Cramping and Injury Incidence in Collegiate Football Players Are Reduced by Creatine Supplementation.’, Journal of athletic training, 38(3), pp. 216–219.

Gualano, B. et al. (2008) ‘Effects of creatine supplementation on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in sedentary healthy males undergoing aerobic training’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 34(2), pp. 245–250. doi: 10.1007/S00726-007-0508-1.

Gualano, B. et al. (2011) ‘Creatine in type 2 diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 43(5), pp. 770–778. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0B013E3181FCEE7D.

Gualano, B. et al. (2016) ‘Creatine supplementation in the aging population: effects on skeletal muscle, bone and brain’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 48(8), pp. 1793–1805. doi: 10.1007/S00726-016-2239-7.

de Guingand, D. L. et al. (2020) ‘Risk of Adverse Outcomes in Females Taking Oral Creatine Monohydrate: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 12(6), pp. 1–26. doi: 10.3390/NU12061780.

Kreider, R. B. et al. (2017) ‘International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: safety and efficacy of creatine supplementation in exercise, sport, and medicine’, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 14(1). doi: 10.1186/s12970-017-0173-z.

Kreider, R. B. and Stout, J. R. (2021) ‘Creatine in Health and Disease’, Nutrients. Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute  (MDPI), 13(2), pp. 1–28. doi: 10.3390/NU13020447.

Lawler, J. M. et al. (2002) ‘Direct antioxidant properties of creatine’, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. Academic Press Inc., 290(1), pp. 47–52. doi: 10.1006/bbrc.2001.6164.

Lopez, R. M. et al. (2009) ‘Does creatine supplementation hinder exercise heat tolerance or hydration status? A systematic review with meta-analyses’, Journal of athletic training. J Athl Train, 44(2), pp. 215–223. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-44.2.215.

Moussa, O. and Chen, R. W. S. (2021) ‘Central retinal vein occlusion associated with creatine supplementation and dehydration’, American journal of ophthalmology case reports. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep, 23. doi: 10.1016/J.AJOC.2021.101128.

Pinto, C. L., Botelho, P. B., Pimentel, G. D., et al. (2016) ‘Creatine supplementation and glycemic control: a systematic review’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 48(9), pp. 2103–2129. doi: 10.1007/S00726-016-2277-1.

Pinto, C. L., Botelho, P. B., Carneiro, J. A., et al. (2016) ‘Impact of creatine supplementation in combination with resistance training on lean mass in the elderly’, Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. Wiley-Blackwell, 7(4), p. 413. doi: 10.1002/JCSM.12094.

Poortmans, J. R. and Francaux, M. (2000) ‘Adverse effects of creatine supplementation: fact or fiction?’, Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.). Sports Med, 30(3), pp. 155–170. doi: 10.2165/00007256-200030030-00002.

Rawson, E. S. and Venezia, A. C. (2011) ‘Use of creatine in the elderly and evidence for effects on cognitive function in young and old’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 40(5), pp. 1349–1362. doi: 10.1007/S00726-011-0855-9.

Ribeiro, F. et al. (2021) ‘Timing of Creatine Supplementation around Exercise: A Real Concern?’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 13(8). doi: 10.3390/NU13082844.

Riesberg, L. A. et al. (2016) ‘Beyond Muscles: The Untapped Potential of Creatine’, International immunopharmacology. NIH Public Access, 37, p. 31. doi: 10.1016/J.INTIMP.2015.12.034.

Roberts, P. A. et al. (2016) ‘Creatine ingestion augments dietary carbohydrate mediated muscle glycogen supercompensation during the initial 24 h of recovery following prolonged exhaustive exercise in humans’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 48(8), pp. 1831–1842. doi: 10.1007/S00726-016-2252-X.

Roschel, H. et al. (2021) ‘Creatine Supplementation and Brain Health’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 13(2), pp. 1–10. doi: 10.3390/NU13020586.

Saito, S. et al. (2022) ‘Creatine supplementation enhances immunological function of neutrophils by increasing cellular adenosine triphosphate’, Bioscience of microbiota, food and health. Biosci Microbiota Food Health, 41(4), pp. 185–194. doi: 10.12938/BMFH.2022-018.

Samadi, M. et al. (2022) ‘Effects of Four Weeks of Beta-Alanine Supplementation Combined with One Week of Creatine Loading on Physical and Cognitive Performance in Military Personnel’, International journal of environmental research and public health. Int J Environ Res Public Health, 19(13). doi: 10.3390/IJERPH19137992.

Santos, E. E. P. Dos et al. (2021) ‘Efficacy of Creatine Supplementation Combined with Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Muscle Mass in Older Females: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis’, Nutrients. Nutrients, 13(11). doi: 10.3390/NU13113757.

Santos, R. V. T. et al. (2004) ‘The effect of creatine supplementation upon inflammatory and muscle soreness markers after a 30km race’, Life Sciences. Life Sci, 75(16), pp. 1917–1924. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2003.11.036.

Sestili, P. et al. (2006) ‘Creatine supplementation affords cytoprotection in oxidatively injured cultured mammalian cells via direct antioxidant activity’, Free radical biology & medicine. Free Radic Biol Med, 40(5), pp. 837–849. doi: 10.1016/J.FREERADBIOMED.2005.10.035.

Sestili, P. et al. (2011) ‘Creatine as an antioxidant’, Amino acids. Amino Acids, 40(5), pp. 1385–1396. doi: 10.1007/S00726-011-0875-5.

Sheikholeslami-Vatani, D. and Faraji, H. (2018) ‘Influence of Creatine Supplementation on Apoptosis Markers After Downhill Running in Middle-Aged Men: A Crossover Randomized, Double-Blind, and Placebo-Controlled Study’, American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation. Am J Phys Med Rehabil, 97(11), pp. 825–831. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000977.

Stares, A. and Bains, M. (2020) ‘The Additive Effects of Creatine Supplementation and Exercise Training in an Aging Population: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials’, Journal of geriatric physical therapy (2001). J Geriatr Phys Ther, 43(2), pp. 99–112. doi: 10.1519/JPT.0000000000000222.

Terjung, R. L. et al. (2000) ‘American College of Sports Medicine roundtable. The physiological and health effects of oral creatine supplementation’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 32(3), pp. 706–717. doi: 10.1097/00005768-200003000-00024.

Tomcik, K. A. et al. (2018) ‘Effects of Creatine and Carbohydrate Loading on Cycling Time Trial Performance’, Medicine and science in sports and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 50(1), pp. 141–150. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001401.

 

I already regularly take hmb/minerals/amino acid/protein supplements - can i take creatine alongside those?

Yes, absolutely. And we’d encourage you to do so. Taken in the right dosage, creatine will work alongside supplements to improve your athletic performance.

Is creatine competition-legal?

Yes. There is no ban against taking creatine supplements. This makes creatine is one of the best alternatives to unauthorised steroids or doping agents

Allergy information

Mr Run’s CREA MAX200 is dairy free, gluten free, egg and nut free, and is suitable for vegetarians and vegans. It contains no known allergens.

Proudly made in the uk

All our products are manufactured in the UK under strict quality controls and manufacturing guidelines in an ISO Class 8 Pharmaceutical room. The factory has been family-run for over 50 years and is MHRA, HFMA, AIB and FDA certified.

Shipping information

UK DELIVERIES: The expected total UK delivery time is 3-4 working days. All UK orders will be packed and dispatched within 24 hours of receipt and shipped via Royal Mail Tracker 48 service.

INTERNATIONAL DELIVERIES: Your order will be shipped within 24 hours of payment via Standard International carriage.

NOTE: Some countries, including EU countries, may charge extra import duties before releasing your shipment. Please check your country’s import rules before placing your order.